Christian talk radio host Bryan Fischer has made a career of generating headline-grabbing remarks. With millions of listeners on his American Family Radio show, he is a prominent voice for Christian conservatives (ones with a more fundamentalist bent).

Fischer works with the American Family Association (AFA), which is arguably one of the country’s largest conservative Christian organizations. The organization led a Christian boycott against Disney due to the company’s policies on homosexuality, but thought it dropped the boycott in 2005.

If you don’t listen to Fischer, then you’re missing out on his unique interpretations of current events. But don’t fret: we follow Fischer so that you don’t have to (not that Fischer is a fan of my coverage of him).

Here are his top five comments from the past few months:

American Family Association's Bryan Fischer

American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer Photo by American Family Association.


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5. A&E’s suspension of Duck Dynasty’s Phil Robertson “is the Mark of the Beast”

Fischer said that the ‘Mark of the Beast’ occurs when there is a “demonically controlled government” that prohibits people of faith from buying or selling without a permit.

A&E’s suspension of Phil Robertson fits this definition, according to Fischer. Christians have interpreted Revelation 13:16-18 to mean that there will be a marking of humans, or a “mark of the beast.”

“This is what’s happening to Phil Robertson. He got bounced off his show, which is a source of income for him,” he said. “So his ability to be involved in the commerce that’s connected to that show has been terminated. That is the Mark of the Beast.”

4. No evolutionists should hold public office 

Fischer didn’t say that it should be illegal for “evolutionists” to run for public office. He said voters should not back a candidate “who thinks we are the descendants of apes and baboons.”

Fischer’s logic is simple: evolution eliminates God; without God, our rights are guaranteed by government; rights secured by government alone can be taken away; so, a person who believes in evolution will use political power to take away your rights.

“No evolutionist can be trusted with political power,” Fischer said.

3. India’s anti-sodomy law is “entirely right and entirely appropriate” 

India’s Supreme Court reinstated an earlier law that made sodomy a crime with a punishment of up to 10 years in prison. The law had been overturned by a lower court four years ago. Fischer saw this as a sign of hope that the U.S. can also change course.

“It shows that this cultural trend that we’re dealing with can be reversed, because for four years it was open season for homosexuals in India, and now that drift away from cultural norms and moral norms [has] been reversed in the country of India,” Fischer said. “Good law in India upheld by the Supreme Court.”

2. Religious liberty only applies to Christians

Fischer has made comments to indicate that he believes religious liberty applies to Christianity.

“If we don’t understand the word ‘religion’ to mean Christianity — as the founders intended it — then we have no way to stop Islam; we have no way to stop Satanism; we have no way to stop any other sort of sinister religion practice that might creep onto the fruited plains,” he said.

Fischer believes that because “every mosque is an actual or potential terrorist cell” and that states should take action to stop Islam from growing.

“Bottom line: if we follow the Constitution as given by the Founders and not as mangled by the courts, states can prohibit the building of mosques if they choose. And choose they should,” Fischer said.

1. Voters should probably be a landowner in order to be eligible to vote 

 According to Fischer, people who don’t own property are like people who don’t pay taxes: they “have no skin in the game.” He said, “…in the colonial period, you had to be a landowner, a property owner to be eligible to vote, and I don’t think that’s a bad idea.”

“If somebody owns property in a community, they’re invested in the community. If they’re renters, they’re going to be up and gone; they could leave the next day,” Fischer said.

Benjamin Franklin had a witty response to such thinking: “Suppose you place the property qualification at the price of an ass. The voter, while riding to the polls, is disabled by the death of the beast, which happens to be his whole property. The man is disfranchised. Now, in whom was the right to vote — in the citizen, or his donkey?”

Apparently, Fischer sides with, uh, the donkey.

BONUS VIDEO: Fischer explains that “homosexual activists” were responsible for the Nazi Party and are acting like totalitarian thugs today:

6 Comments

  1. Mark Silk

    As long as we’re quoting Benjamin Franklin, here’s what that founder meant by religion, in a passage from his autobiography in which he describes the building of a meeting hall in Philadelphia to accommodate the preaching of the great evangelist George Whitefield in 1739:

    “And it being found inconvenient to assemble in the open Air, subject to its inclemencies, the Building of a House to meet in was no sooner propos’d and Persons appointed to receive Contributions, but sufficient Sums were soon receiv’d to procure the Ground and erect the Building, which was 100 feet long and 70 broad, about the Size of Westminster Hall, and the Work was carried on with such Spirit as to be finished in a much shorter time than could have been expected. Both House and Ground were vested in Trustees, expressly for the Use of any Preacher of any religious Persuasion who might desire to say something to the People of Philadelphia, the Design [purpose] in building not being to accommodate any particular Sect, but the Inhabitants in general, so that even if the Mufti of Constantinople were to send a Missionary to preach Mahometanism [Islam] to us, he would find a Pulpit at his Service.”

    No more did Franklin and his associates want their community to stop preachers of Islam than they wanted it to stop Whitefield.

  2. Earold Gunter

    Tobin, another great article, but I have to disagree with you on a couple of things.
    First, these are unfortunately very believability quotes.
    Second, Fischer doesn’t side with the donkey, he is the donkey, or rather it’s cousin the ass.

    Unfortunately there is a contingency who feel they are the true christians who also hold hard right political views. I read an article somewhere that called them “Leviticans”, which I thought was quite appropriate. These zealots remind me of the extremist muslims, just not quite as committed.

    Religion is poison!!

  3. Oh dearie, me! This guy’s ignorance is what is so frightening. God save us from the stupid and the ignorant, so says a friend of mine. I have to agree.

    • What is really frightening is that there is an audience for his nonsense.

      Calling it ignorance is to give Fischer too much credit. It assumes that he would say more sensible, less hateful things if he knew better. But I don’t think he ever would. It is more useful and profitable for him to appeal to bigotry, ignorance, fundamentalist self-righteousness than to say anything which shows sanity.

      • Re: “What is really frightening is that there is an audience for his nonsense.”

        Indeed. And that is where the entire problem lies. We aren’t just talking about one man spewing nasty, hateful bile. If we were, his words would hardly be news; he’d be considered just some raging lunatic and that would be the end of it.

        But that just isn’t the case. Fischer represents the AFA, which is a very large, very influential, and very well-funded organization. His words aren’t those of just one crazed madman; they reflect the views of the AFA’s nearly 200,000 actively-contributing members.

        That’s a lot of people to be thinking such hateful things. One must also assume that there are many more who agree with those views but haven’t signed on formally as members.

        What’s more, if his long track-record of nasty statements genuinely bothered enough people, he’d have been yanked off the air long ago. That nothing has been done in this regard, given the many years Fischer has been at this, is quite telling. No one can convince me that anything he says can possibly be taken as just one madman’s insane rants. They are, rather, the views of hundreds of thousands, and perhaps millions, of Americans.

        That’s frightening.

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